Call for Applications for the 2016-2017 HASTAC Scholars Program

Deadline for applications: August 26, 2016
Announcement of Award: September 5, 2016

Are you a graduate student engaged with innovative projects and research at the intersection of digital media and learning, 21st-century education, and technology in the arts, humanities and sciences? Would you like join an international conversation about the digital humanities? If so, you are invited to apply for the opportunity to become a 2016-2017 HASTAC scholar. As a Scholar, you will represent Fordham University at HASTAC’s prestigious, online community. Two successful candidates will each receive a $300 honorarium from the office of the Dean of GSAS.

HASTAC (pronounced "haystack"), which stands for Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory, is an interdisciplinary, international network of undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, as well as librarians, archivists, museum curators, publishers, and IT specialists. Members of the HASTAC community blog, host forums, organize events, and discuss new ideas, projects, and technologies that reconceive teaching, learning, research, writing and structuring knowledge. For more information about HASTAC Scholars and to see their discussion forums, please see the HASTAC Scholars website and also this page.

Successful candidates will:
  • Remain in good standing with the university.
  • Give one workshop centered on integrating digital tools into the classroom or research. The workshop will be open to the campus community and given by April 2016.
  • Be an active participant in the Fordham Graduate Student Digital Humanities Group by leading or planning one or more events related to the digital humanities, including workshops, speakers, and/or reading groups.
  • Frequently engage, according to your interests and abilities, in the discussions taking place on the HASTAC website, as well as related events taking place during the year.
  • Between September and May, contribute no fewer than two posts per semester to the HASTAC Scholars blog and to the Fordham GSDH blog. (These may be cross-posted.)
  • Report your activities at least twice a semester to a faculty mentor to be assigned to you.

Applications will be evaluated based on the scholar’s activities in the areas of digital humanities research, pedagogy and technology, and service to the community. Highly motivated students with limited exposure to the digital humanities are encouraged to apply. This opportunity is an excellent way to learn more about digital media and practices.

To make the application, please answer the following the questions:
  • Why do you want to become a HASTAC Scholar?
  • How will being a HASTAC Scholar support your current work at work Fordham? Please speak to this question in terms of both your teaching and research, noting your experience with digital humanities research and pedagogy.
  • What strengths and experience can you contribute to the HASTAC community?
  • Briefly summarize two blog postings that you might contribute to the HASTAC Scholars blog.

Your application must include a brief recommendation from a faculty member who can speak to your scholarship and ability to collaborate with others, both in person and online.

Send applications and recommendations as Word Documents to Dr. Elizabeth Cornell, cornellgoldw@fordham.edu, with "YOURLASTNAME-HASTAC APP" as the subject line. Applications are due no later than 5:00 PM, August 26, 2016. Members of Fordham’s faculty Digital Humanities Working Group will review applications and two scholars will be announced no later than September 5. Selected scholars should make an application at the HASTAC website by September 12. Details for that procedure will follow if you are selected.



Fordham Announces 2015-2016 HASTAC Scholars and Campus DH Scholars

The Fordham Digital Humanities Working Group and the Graduate School of Arts and Science are pleased to announce the 2015-2016 HASTAC Scholars:  Christy Pottroff (PhD candidate, English) and Tobias Hrynick (PhD candidate, History). Our HASTAC Scholars represent Fordham's lively digital humanities community in HASTAC's distinguished, international online forum. In their roles as HASTAC Scholars at Fordham, they will contribute to the campus digital humanities dialogue by organizing workshops, reading groups, writing blog posts about their work, and other activities. HASTAC Scholars are generously funded by the GSAS.

Christy L. Pottroff is a Ph.D. candidate in English where she specializes in nineteenth-century American literature, queer and feminist theory, and digital humanities. Her dissertation, “The Mail Gaze: Early American Women’s Literature, Letters, and the Post Office, 1790-1865," examines the fascinating and understudied influence of the United States Postal Service on women’s participation in early national literature and politics.  Christy has received fellowships from the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Santander Universities International, and Fordham University. Recently, she was awarded first-place in the NYC Digital Humanities Graduate Student Digital Project Award. Pottroff is a teaching fellow, co-editor of Rhetorikos: Excellence in Student Writing, and is a co-coordinator of the Fordham Digital Humanities Graduate Student Group Last year, she the 2014-15 Digital Humanities Campus Scholar. Christy is also a member of Fordham’s LGBT and Ally Network of Support. She has an MA in cultural studies and a graduate certificate in women’s studies from Kansas State University.

Tobias Hrynick is a PhD student in the History Department. He has an MA in Medieval Atudies from Fordham, and a BA in English and History from the University of Maine. His chief area of study is high and late medieval environmental history, particularly of wetlands. He is also interested in medieval mapping and digital mapping as a tool of modern historians. Recenly Toby has collaborate with two digital mapping projects of Fordham’s Center for Medieval Studies: “Exploring Place in the French of Italy,” and “The Oxford Outremer Map.”

This year’s 2015-16 Campus Digital Scholars are Boyda Johnstone and Alex Profaci. The Campus Digital Humanities Scholars program fosters digital scholarship among the graduate student body by providing mentoring and support to new members of the community. The Campus DH Scholars are generously funded by the GSAS.

Boyda Johnstone is a PhD Candidate in the Department of English and current co-organizer of the Fordham Graduate Digital Humanities Group. Her dissertation examines dream culture and interpretation in the late Middle Ages. This interdisciplinary dissertation examines the groundswell of interest in dreams and visions between the thirteenth and fifteenth centuries in England. Boyda’s publishing credits include reviews and articles for Medieval & Renaissance Drama in England, Early Theatre, and Editing, Performance, and Texts. She is an active blogger for the collaborative feminist academic Hook & Eye, a popular Canadian feminist academic blog, which was recently cited in the SSHRC/McGill "White Paper on the Future of the PhD in the Humanities" as a useful professionalization resource for PhDs.

Alexander Profaci is in his second year of the MA program in Medieval Studies, where he studies the historiographic culture of England, France and Spain. He is interested in how digital visualizations can help scholars to reassess the production of historical texts in medieval Europe. Beyond this, he is also interested in the theoretical implications of digitizing texts and manuscripts. At the Center for Medieval Studies, Alexander is currently doing digital maintenance work and research for the “Oxford Map Project,” affiliated with the Center’s “French of Outremer" digital humanities project.


This year's jurors for the HASTAC and Campus Digital Scholar awards were members of the Steering Committee of Fordham's Digital Humanities Working Group.


Steven E. Jones on Father Roberto Busa, SJ, and the Emergence of Humanities Computing

Fordham's Digital Humanities Group, along with the American Studies Program and the Department of Theology, are delighted to welcome Professor Steven E. Jones to discuss his fascinating new research on the legacy of Italian Jesuit and linguist Roberto Busa, SJ, who has come to be known as a founding father of digital humanities.

Busa's pathbreaking work on a digital concordance of the works of Thomas Aquinas was made possible by support he secured from IBM Founder Thomas Watson in the late 1940s. The Index Thomisticus is actively used by scholars today, and demonstrated the value of using new technologies in developing humanities scholarship and resources.

Steven E. Jones is Professor of English and Co-Director of the Center for Textual Studies and Digital Humanities at Loyola University Chicago. His research interests include romantic-period literature, textual studies, and the digital humanities. He is author, most recently, of The Emergence of the Digital Humanities (2013) and  Codename Revolution: The Nintendo Wii Platform (2012).

Join us for this lecture, which promises to explore the links between digital scholarship and the traditions of Jesuit inquiry!

Fall 2014 Digital Humanities Programs Kick-Off with Workshops on "R" and Geospatial Mapping

Fall 2014 Digital Humanities workshops kick-off next next Monday with a workshop on the powerful open source data analysis program "R" and continue in October with a workshop on geospatial mapping for the digital humanities:

Monday, September 22: "R" for the Digital Humanities, a workshop led by Brian Reilly (Fordham University) (NEXT WEEK!)
1:00-2:30 pm | Rose Hill Campus, Keating 318 

"R" is a free software environment for statistical computing and graphics. It runs on a wide variety of UNIX platforms, Windows and MacOS and has numerous uses in humanities computing including topic modeling, data mining, and data visualization. Don't miss this workshop if you're interested in the use of powerful data analytics in exploring humanities questions.

Brian J. Reilly is an Associate Professor in the Department of Modern Languages and Literature at Fordham University. His research includes medieval literature and science, while his teaching includes contemporary French and Francophone languages, literatures, and cultures. His digital humanities research includes work on authorship attribution through quantitative analysis.

Wednesday, October 29: "Spatial and Digital Mapping" David Wrisley (American University of Beirut) 
2:30-4:30pm | Rose Hill Campus, Keating 318 


Faceted browsing and timeline in Visualizing Medieval Places
The model of spatiality embedded in our research affects the way we map information. Join us for a workshop with David Wrisley, co-led by Fordham's own David Levine, to explore tools and techniques of analysis using GIS and digital mapping. Discussed in particular will be questions of modeling and curation of a spatial dataset and the emergence of new mapping platforms.

David Joseph Wrisley is an Associate Professor in the Department of English and the Civilization Sequence Program at the American University of Beirut. His research is in medieval comparative literatures and digital humanities. He is interested in the history of translation and rewriting in particular at the fifteenth-century court of Burgundy. He is also interested in Mediterranean polysystems linking post-classical Arabic and medieval European literatures, as well as digital means for archiving and visualizing them. He is working on a project about space, place and time in medieval texts entitled Visualizing Medieval Places.

These programs have been organized by the Medieval Studies Program and co-sponsored by the Digital Humanities Working Group.

2014-2015 Fordham HASTAC Scholars and Campus Digital Scholar Announced

The Fordham Digital Humanities Working Group and the Graduate School of Arts and Science are pleased to announce the 2014-2015 HASTAC Scholars:  Louie Dean Valencia García (History) and David Levine (Medieval Studies). The HASTAC Scholars represent Fordham's lively digital humanities community in HASTAC's distinguished online forum and contribute to campus digital humanities dialogue by organizing workshops, reading groups, and other activities.

Louie Dean Valencia García 
Louie Dean Valencia García is a senior teaching fellow and Ph.D. candidate studying Early Modern and Modern European History at Fordham University in New York City. He has been a Santander Summer Scholar, and received prestigious fellowships from Fordham's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Spanish Ministry of Education, Sports, and Culture, and the Swann Foundation at the United States Library of Congress.

Louie studies cultural history, the production of space, and everyday dissent in youth and subaltern cultures in contemporary history. He has researched, presented, and written internationally on questions related to the creation of democratic and pluralistic spaces. He is especially interested in youth culture in the 1960s and 80s, and the Spanish counter-cultural movement, the “Movida Madrileña”. His research relies on GIS and Social Network Analysis.

He has been featured in MSNBC, Al-Jazeera's The Stream, The New York Times, EstoÉ, amongst other international news organizations. He has been published in anthologies such as The Ages of Superman (McFarland Press, 2012) and The Gallows are Busy (Cicada Press, 2013). He will also be included in the anthology "The Punk Aesthetic in Comics," forthcoming from McFarland in 2015.

David Levine
David Levine is a second-year MA student in Medieval Studies at Fordham University. His primary interest is resource management and exploitation – especially pertaining to woodland – in Medieval England. His work uses multiple database programs and GIS to collect woodland locations in East Anglia and display these locations in possible configurations according to size and time period. David has attended the University of Lancaster's Summer School program, led by Ian Gregory and titled "GIS and the Humanities," and will be attending the DHSI in Victoria next June to work on TEI, building DH programs, and OCR. David completed my BA from SUNY-Binghamton in May of 2013 with a double major in History and Medieval Studies and currently serves as the Graduate Student Association Representative for Medieval Studies.

Christy Pottroff
The 2014-2015 Campus Digital Humanities Scholar is Christy Pottroff. Christy is earning her PhD in 19th Century American Literature at Fordham University. Her dissertation, "The Mail Gaze: Early Women's Literature, Letters, and the Post Office, 1790-1865," investigates the influence of the United States Postal Service on women's participation in early national literature and politics. She is working on a digital mapping project that traces the growth of the postal service in its first decades. Christy teaches composition and is a co-editor of Rhetorikos, Fordham’s online journal for exceptional first-year writing.

This year's HASTAC and Campus Digital Humanities Scholars Committee included Dr. Elizabeth Cornell (Information Technology Communications Specialist), Professor Mary Anne Kowaleski (Distinguished Professor, History/Medieval Studies), Professor Micki McGee (Director, American Studies), and Dr. Laura Morreale (Associate Director, Medieval Studies).

The 2014-2015 HASTAC Scholars Program at Fordham has been made possible through the generous support of the the Graduate School of Arts and Science. The 2014-2015 Campus Digital Humanities Scholars program is possible thanks to the support of the Department of English.

Please join us in congratulating this year's HASTAC and Campus Digital Humanities Scholars!